mini reviews

Mini Reviews: New Takes on Old Tales

I’m sharing some more mini reviews today as I catch up from my blogging break. The three books featured in this post all offer new takes on old classics: The Canterbury Tales, Prince Dracula, and the common tropes/themes of YA scifi. That last one will make more sense when you read my review of Nyxia. Some were certainly more successful than others, so keep reading to find out which of these I’d recommend!

Feral YouthFeral Youth by Shaun David Hutchinson
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Feral Youth is a YA retelling of The Canterbury Tales, edited by Shaun David Hutchinson, so I was incredibly excited to read this. This anthology follows a group of teen delinquents at wilderness camp who are on a 3-day trek back to camp, and have a story telling competition along the way.

The stories in this collection run the gamut of genres: there is folklore, fanfic, creepy, and contemporary. Each character’s story is written by a different YA author, with Shaun David Hutchinson taking the narrator’s perspective to weave it all together. I really enjoyed this premise, and I of course liked some stories more than others, but I still enjoyed nearly every single story. Feral Youth has great representation, both in terms of race and sexual orientation, and it’s a collection fundamentally about knowing that you’re more than your mistakes. This book confronts the treatment of “at risk” kids, disproportionately those who are people of color and often poor, and exposes the ways in which our society doesn’t give them a fair shot, much less an honest second chance.

*I received an eARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for a free and honest review.

Nyxia (The Nyxia Triad, #1)Nyxia by Scott Reintgen
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

Nyxia is the first book in a new trilogy about teens traveling to a new planet who have to decide what they’re willing to risk for the fortune of a lifetime. Our main character and narrator is Emmett, and he and the other teens are competing for spots to mine the mysterious substance called Nyxia on the distant planet Eden. It must be said that Nyxia is pretty typical YA scifi – there’s an evil corporation, teens in space, and the questionable ethics of colonizing planets with a native population.

The world building in Nyxia is super basic, although there will be an entirely new world/planet that we’ll surely learn about in the next book. I thought this would be a rare YA without romance, but nope. About 80% into this book, there is a forced instalove relationship that made no sense other than to create unnecessary angst for Emmett. It was honestly so dumb that I nearly gave up reading at that point. The entire book is just the competition to win a spot on Eden, and as you can probably tell, that was so monotonous. A trilogy is absolutely unnecessary, because this first book could have easily been edited down and combined with the next book. This book was 300 pages of teens repeating the same events in a competition for 200 days, and it was ridiculous. Nyxia was admittedly enjoyable enough, but unexciting and unoriginal.

*I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for a free and honest review.

Hunting Prince Dracula (Stalking Jack the Ripper, #2)Hunting Prince Dracula by Kerri Maniscalco
My rating: 3 of 5 stars

This sequel to Stalking Jack the Ripper follows Audrey Rose Wadsworth and Thomas Cresswell as they attend a forensics program in Romania, but find themselves in the midst of another investigation when murders occur in a similar fashion to Vlad the Impaler. While I enjoyed Stalking Jack the Ripper last year, I don’t love this series quite as much as others. That being said, I do adore Audrey Rose and Thomas, and their banter. The best thing about these books, by far, is that they’re so feminist. Audrey Rose makes a place for herself in a male dominated field (as was…every field in the 19th century), and I really enjoy seeing her assert herself in the numerous situations in which she’s discounted for being female. Audrey Rose doesn’t have time for your misogyny. There is a great running theme in this novel, in which Audrey Rose wonders if marrying Thomas will compromise her autonomy, and how she’s unwilling to have any man, including Thomas, speak for her and belittle her. Those great character moments are some of the strongest in this book.

However, the whole Dracula thing was just bonkers. It made no sense and felt very unsatisfying, and I especially didn’t like that it was tied to a certain character. Overall, the Dracula angle just seemed dumb and gimmicky. And that’s really saying something, considering the first book was about Jack the Ripper. It’ll be interesting to see what these two get up to in American for the third book.

Rating: 3.25

*I received an ARC of this from the publisher in exchange for a free and honest review.

View all my reviews

If you’ve read any of the books mentioned in this post, let me know what you thought of them!